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Conn 88H trombones

The 88H series trombones made by C G Conn are the most popular large bore professional trombones in the UK. The main reason quoted is sound. Above all things this is what most musicians strive for and here in the UK the thrilling sound of the Conn 88H trombone can be heard riding over all of our major symphony orchestras. It is a fantastically resonant instrument and responds at the quietest of dynamics whilst maintaining its quality at a ferocious fortissimo. If upgrading from a student trombone, it is a very safe purchase as re-sale values are very high and wherever the student arrives for a lesson or audition, if playing an 88H the choice of instrument will never be in question. If renewing your pro horn, the build quality has never been better and with prices still low, it’s a good time to try a few out in store and find your trombone.

There are a number of different models from which to choose, the difference between which I have outlined below.

Model: Conn 88H trombone.

  • 8.5” Rose Brass bell
  • .547” primary bore through hand slide
  • .562” bore through F section
  • Closed wrap

This is the most popular model.

Model: Conn 88HO trombone

  • 8.5” Rose Brass bell
  • .547” primary bore through hand slide
  • .562” bore through F section
  • Open Wrap
This trombone is the same as the 88H except it features an open wrap design to the F side, this can allow the F side to be more free blowing and as such useful in the lower registers. It does however protrude significantly behind the shoulder and this can be significant for younger players or those sitting very close to the pit wall!
 
Model: Conn 88HT
  • 8.5” Thin Wall Rose Brass bell.
  • .547” primary bore through hand slide
  • .562” bore through F section
  • Closed wrap

This trombone is the same as the 88H but with a thinner bell. This leads to greater resonance at lower dynamics, more response and a lighter tone. It can however lead to a brighter and more brittle sound at loud dynamics

Model: Conn 88HTO

  • 8.5” Thin Wall Rose Brass bell.
  • .547” primary bore through hand slide
  • .562” bore through F section
  • Open Wrap

This trombone is the same as the 88HO but with a thinner bell. This leads to greater resonance at lower dynamics, more response and a lighter tone. It can however lead to a brighter and more brittle sound at loud dynamics

Model: Conn 88HY

  • 8.5” Yellow Brass bell
  • .547” primary bore through hand slide
  • .562” bore through F section
  • Closed wrap

This trombone is the same as the 88H but with a yellow brass bell. This can give a brighter, lighter sound though many feel this model lacks the characteristic warm sound of the 88H

Model: Conn 88HYO

  • 8.5” Yellow Brass bell
  • .547” primary bore through hand slide
  • .562” bore through F section
  • Open wrap

This trombone is the same as the 88HO but with a yellow brass bell. This can give a brighter, lighter sound though many feel this model lacks the characteristic warm sound of the 88H

Model Conn 88HCL

  • 8.5” Rose Brass bell
  • .547” primary bore through hand slide
  • .562” bore through F section
  • Closed wrap
  • Patented CL2000 Lindberg Rotor system
  • Designed in conjunction with Christian Lindberg the famous trombone soloist this version of the 88H has a different rotor. It is very similar to the Hagmann valve system and is ultimately a free flow rotor allowing for greater power on the F side. The trombone is also available in all the bell options above T, Y and SGX.
Model: Conn 8H
  • 8.5” Rose Brass bell
  • .547” primary bore through hand slide

This is the straight tenor version of the 88H without valve and F attachment. Useful for committed first trombones, it is obviously lighter to hold and carry around than the 88H. The reduced weight also transfers into the playability of the trombone and many feel it is more resonant as a result.

Model: Conn 88HSGX

  • 8.5” Sterling silver bell with 24K gold plate inside bell and on rotor.
  • .547” primary bore through hand slide
  • .562” bore through F section
  • Closed wrap
  • The 88H with go faster stripes! Though not at all a gimmick. The sterling silver bell makes a large difference and some players love it. The silver bell is fantastically resonant whilst being warmer and darker in colour. The result is the best of both worlds, a lovely warm sound whilst maintaining phenomenal projection to the back of the hall. This model is particularly popular with soloists.
Custom Slides and lead pipes 
For those wishing to fine tune their chosen 88H there are a number of different slide and lead pipe options available to order. The slide assemblies and be ordered as an accessory alone for around £900 or ordered, at an additional cost, as part of a new 88H outfit (this is the most cost effective way of getting the custom slide of your choosing and usually adds about £135 to the usual outfit price). Contact us if you’re interested in these options and we’ll work out the best deal we can for you.
 

Hand Slide Options:

SL2525: .525" Straight bore hand slide with 3 removable lead pipes, models H, and T (small tenor shank), and X (large shank)

SL2547: Dual bore, .525" bore in upper tube - .547" bore in lower tube, three removable lead pipes models H, T (small tenor shank), and X (large shank)

SL4747: Traditional 88H slide, .547" bore in upper and lower tubes, three removable lead pipes, models S, R and M

SL4762: - Dual bore, .547" bore in upper tube - .562" bore in lower tube, three removable lead pipes, models S, R and M

SL6262: - Traditional bass slide, .562" bore in upper and lower tubes, three removable lead pipes, models B, C and D

 

Lead pipe options:


S Lead pipe - features standard large shank receiver and taper designed for traditional response characteristics. For SL4747 and SL4762.

R Lead pipe - features Remington large shank receiver and longer taper designed for traditional response characteristics. For SL4747 and SL4762.

M Lead pipe - features standard large shank receiver and longer taper designed for less resistance. For SL4747 and SL4762

H Lead pipe - features standard small shank receiver with short venturi designed for added flexibility. For SL2525 and SL2547

T Lead pipe - features standard small shank receiver with a long venturi designed for added flexibility. For SL2525 and SL2547

X Lead pipe - features standard large shank receiver with a straight taper designed for great flexibility. For SL2525 and SL2547.

B Leadpipe - features standard large shank receiver with a long venturi & slower taper designed for traditional response characteristics. For SL6262.

C Lead pipe - features standard large shank receiver with a short venturi and slower taper for added stability. For SL6262

D Lead pipe - features standard large shank receiver with a short venturi and quick taper for increased flexibility. For SL6262

 

88H; THE STORY 

THE STORY of the C.G. Conn® 88H trombone ultimately begins in 1875 with the vision and determination of one man: Charles Gerard Conn (1844-1931). Born in upstate New York, C.G. Conn was a Civil War soldier and cornetist who, in 1875, founded a band instrument manufacturing company in the small town of Elkhart, Indiana. Though known primarily for his innovative cornets, Conn rapidly branched out into other brass instruments and by the turn of the century was producing many different styles of valve and slide trombones. Under Conn’s direction, his company grew to become the largest producer of trombones in the United States and earned a lasting reputation as “America’s trombone house.” In 1915, Carl Greenleaf purchased the C.G. Conn Company, renaming it C.G. Conn Ltd. Greenleaf soonBegan an aggressive research and development program which resulted in a wealth of new trombones and other instruments. Among these was the 8H, a .547˝ bore straight symphonic trombone available with an optional F attachment. In the 1940’s, responding to the more demanding role of low brass in contemporary symphonic literature, C.G. Conn Ltd. Began refining the 8H. With the assistance of “The Chief,” Dr. Emory Remington, Conn perfected this design and in 1954 introduced the Model 88H. This instrument, the definitive 88H, incorporated the features which are still recognized by trombonists everywhere: 8-1/2˝ thin wall rose brass bell, rose brass outer slides, and Remington taper mouthpiece and receiver.The 88H rapidly gained popularity as a symphonic tenor trombone in ensembles favouring a heroic, robust lower brass section. Its unique tone colour and refusal to “break up” even at the most extreme dynamics made it one of the most widespread professional symphonic trombones in the United States and throughout much of Europe. The Conn 88H has remained in continuous production since its introduction, a record unequalled by any other American symphonic trombone. Tastes and musical requirements change, of course. Modern trombonists are routinely expected to perform literature that makes technical demands which were unheard-of when the 88H was introduced. Therefore, in the 1990’s United Musical Instruments (successor to C.G. Conn Ltd.) introduced a second generation of 88H: the 88H “GEN2.” Today’s Conn 88H GEN2 is available in open and closed wrap configurations; with standard rotor valve or Christian Lindberg CL2000 valve (patent pending); in four bell materials; with straight and dual bore slides; and with interchangeable lead pipes for bothRemington and standard taper mouthpiece shanks. These options, combined with other UMI improvements— such as tapered rotor bodies and bearings, mechanical linkages, and adjustable thumb levers — have made the Conn 88H GEN2 the choice of discriminating professional trombonists around the world. UMI has also introduced a new level of manufacturing sophistication to the 88H at its facility in Eastlake, Ohio, the proud home of the 88H GEN2 family. Today’s 88H GEN2 trombones are sophisticated and contemporary in every sense — but they continue to reflect the genius of C.G. Conn, Carl Greenleaf, Emory Remington, and the legions of players who have made the 88H a legend in the tromboneCommunity. The Conn 88H GEN2. A trombone with a future as bright as it’s past.   

CG Conn; The History 

C.G. Conn, the oldest continuous manufacturer of band instruments in America, literally gave birth to the U.S. band instrument manufacturing industry. Today, C.G. Conn encompasses some of the greatest names in musical instruments - C.G. Conn, King and Benge brass instruments, Artley and Armstrong woodwinds and Scherl & Roth strings. Always committed to serving the needs of students, music educators, amateurs, and professionals, C.G. Conn's storied history reflects a dedication for innovation and quest for the ultimate in design and craftsmanship - an industry leader in musical performance.One Saturday night in 1873, Civil War veteran Charles Gerard Conn got involved in a brawl that resulted in a split lip. Not good news for a man who played cornet with the Elkhart, Indiana "Brick Brown Band." In order to get around this problem, Colonel Conn set out to perfect a special rubber-cushioned mouthpiece so he could continue playing. The new mouthpiece, which he later patented, caught the eye of other musicians. He made a few for his friends, but soon there was such a demand for his mouthpieces that he rigged up a lathe from an old sewing machine and began turning them out as fast as possible.In 1875, a French musical instrument maker named Dupont stopped by the shop and asked if he might use Conn's bench to repair some horns. After watching him work for several days, Conn decided that he, too, could make a horn. In that same year, in a closet-size shop only 20 feet square, Col. Conn produced the first American-built cornet.By 1879 the shop moved into larger quarters, and Conn began adding instruments to his line. In 1888, Colonel Conn brought 15 European instrument craftsmen to the United States and gave them the space, the tools and the incentive to make the finest instruments their skills would allow. Their expertise, teamed with the Colonel's ingenuity and ambition, soon produced instruments so exceptional that they were accorded highest honors in the 1893 World's Columbia Exposition in Chicago.Twice the Conn plant burned to the ground. Twice it was rebuilt, bigger and better than before. Famous bandmasters and musicians visited the plant and personally endorsed "Conn Wonder Instruments." John Phillip Sousa, Patrick Gilmore, Herbert Clarke, Arthur Pryor, A. Liberati and others were frequent visitors.Vaudeville was at its peak, and the theatres and music halls of Elkhart saw a steady procession of the finest bands and musicians of the day. All played the Colonel's instruments. Conn instruments - ornate and often jewelled - became world famous as Sousa and others toured Europe playing before kings, queens and czars.The Colonel also loved strange and bizarre instruments. In 1907 he built an Immensaphone, the largest horn in the world. It measured 12 feet in diameter and 35 feet long. The Conn factory also built the world's largest drum, a slide tuba to make noises like a ship's warning whistle, tenor tubas for the jackass role in Strauss' Don Juan, and a saxophone for one-armed musician Al Miller.Since the first American cornet in 1875, C.G. Conn continued producing "firsts" throughout its distinguished history: the first American saxophone, first double-bell euphonium, first sousaphone (built to the great Sousa's specifications), and a long list of many others.In 1915, Colonel Conn sold the C.G. Conn Company to C.D. Greenleaf. Greenleaf, almost clairvoyantly, realized a need for the advancement of instrumental music in the schools. His foresight and energy continued to add to Conn's innovations. He was responsible for founding the first national school for band directors, first and only centre for the study of musical acoustics, first successful short action valves, first all-electronic organ and first fibreglass sousaphones, among other legendary advancements.During World War II the Conn factory was completely converted to manufacture precision instruments for defence. Conn received four Army-Navy "E" Awards - the first given in the band instrument industry. During the Korean War part of the facilities was converted to defence production, and Conn achieved another record in precision manufacturing.Many of today's most preferred instruments owe their original success to Conn's innovation. C.G. Conn French horns, for example, have been the horn of choice for the Hollywood film industry for most of the 20th Century. C.G. Conn Symphony Series trombones have a legendary place in the classical trombone world. Today's best trumpet players are discovering the break-through performance with Vintage One trumpets. These innovative designs, enhanced by superior craftsmanship and technological breakthroughs, have provided today's musicians with the superior instrument performance.Building on the proven designs of the past, C.G. Conn continues to meet the demands of today's best musicians. As well, amateur and student musicians can enjoy the very best in instrument technology and performance with brass instruments and saxophones from C.G. Conn 

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